5 Best Stores For DIY Projects

I, for one, enjoy learning new things by doing them. Thus, making use of good opportunities to get everything I need in one place for a project is really appealing to me.

Here, we’re going to talk about five stores I think are good for your next DIY project. Along with the recommendations for each store, I’ll also talk about the projects I think each caters to the best. My idea here is to appeal to a wide variety of skillsets, to encourage you to try something new or to engage with a hobby you’d let go by the wayside.

Primary Arms

Building an AR15 is an immensely satisfying project, and with the right parts, tools, and some time spent watching videos about it, it’s more doable than ever.

As far as where to get all of the parts, my go-to is Primary Arms: they have everything you’d need to build an AR upper receiver of your own, and their customer service is always helpful if you have questions.

With mostly basic tools and a little bit of patience, it’s more than possible to build an awesome-quality AR in just a few hours, that you’ll have the joy of shooting for years.

Ikea

Ikea is inherently a DIY store, in that you have to assemble everything you buy there, except for the food. Which, by the way, make time for lunch while you’re there, it’s actually pretty decent food for absurdly cheap prices.

Here, I want to focus on Ikea hacking or using the pieces in ways not explicitly recommended. For example, the desk from which I’m writing this is technically a countertop I got from the display section, a dresser, and some table legs. A little sanding and some work with a hole saw, and now I have friends asking me to hack their desks, too.

Newegg

With a new desk goes a new gaming PC. At least, that’s what I told myself, and I told the IRS both are for work purposes. Newegg is an online retailer that specializes in computer parts, but they have all kinds of electronics and home goods these days.

While it’s still about impossible to find a graphics card, it’s usually possible to build a high-end gaming PC on Newegg without needing to shop anywhere else, and often their prices and customer service make them my go-to spot on the web for any electronics.

Lowes

For a good bit of what I’ve mentioned so far, you’re going to need tools. My advice is to get the best tools you can afford. For example, I still have my grandfather’s Estwing framing hammer, and it works as well today as it did when he bought it decades ago.

Lowes often has a selection of price grades on tools, and I prefer to err on the side of pricey: I’d rather something come with a warranty or replacements than saving a few bucks but ending up stranded in the middle of a project with, for example, a heat gun that caught on fire and almost burned my apartment building down.

Your Local Grocery Store

Not every DIY project has to involve guns, wood, electricity, or tools. Now, to be fair you could absolutely use all of those in finding a recipe, hunting the required animal, and then cooking the thing you hunt.

But, I’d suggest that, even if you don’t cook, that you take the chance every now and again to make something new and unfamiliar. You might just discover that you do, in fact, like vegetables just fine, but your mom’s method of steaming everything good out of them was not for you.

In this piece, we’ve gone thought five places we trust to help with our DIY projects. With a little bit of homework, and not being afraid to consult with experts at these five stores, it’s more possible than ever to get a lot of excellent projects done.

If you follow through on this whole list, we’d argue that you will have gotten some seriously cool stuff out of the deal, and probably learned more than one new skill along the way. For us, that’s the important part, to continually try to learn and improve our skills.